oceanofinfo Ekim 5, 2020
cervical cancer symptoms

January has been determined as the cervical cancer awareness month all over the world.
Be careful Cervical cancer symptoms; if you have complaints such as pain or bleeding during or after sexual intercourse, groin pain after gynecological examination, unusual, smelly discharge from the vagina!

The cervix (cervix) is the neck of the uterus that opens into the vagina. The cervix not only protects the uterus from infections, but also acts as a door to keep the baby growing inside the uterus in the womb during pregnancy.
Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women under 45 years of age worldwide. Cervical cancer comes in the third place after breast and lung cancer in cancer deaths in women.

What is cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer occurs when the cervical cells lose their normal structure and begin to grow and multiply uncontrollably.

What are the causes of cervical cancer?

It has been determined that all cervical cancers contain 99.7 percent of HPV DNA. In scientific publications, it is stated that the presence of HPV is necessary for cancer development in the cervix, but it is not sufficient.
In other words, some auxiliary factors are needed for HPV infection to cause cancer. It shows that the HPV type is definitely at high risk in terms of cancer, and all 3 types are probably high risk. The cause of cervical cancer is human papillomavirus (HPV). There are over 100 types of HPV available. Two types of HPV (HPV 16 and 18) cause most of the cervical cancer cases.

Cervical cancer symptoms

Cervical cancer usually does not show symptoms, especially in the early stages. Therefore, it is very important for women to go to the doctor for regular screening.

When symptoms occur, they may include:
  • Pain or bleeding during or after sexual intercourse
  • Groin pain after gynecological examination
  • Abnormal, smelly discharge from the vagina Blood spots or light bleeding other than normal menstruation

These complaints may also be in some serious diseases other than cervical cancer. For this reason, symptoms should be evaluated quickly by a doctor. Today, more than 99 percent of cervical cancers think that HPV is the cause. HPV is a common virus that will infect more than two-thirds of sexually active women at some point in their lives.
Infection with HPV does not necessarily mean that there will be cervical cancer. The immune system removes 90 percent of this virus from the body within 12-18 months after being infected with this virus. In the 10 percent section where HPV cannot be cleared, formations such as pre-cancer and cancer can be found in the cervix within 5-10 years.

Infection with HPV does not necessarily mean that there will be cervical cancer. The immune system removes 90 percent of this virus from the body within 12-18 months after being infected with this virus. In the 10 percent section where HPV cannot be cleared, formations such as pre-cancer and cancer can be found in the cervix within 5-10 years.

Other risk factors for cervical cancer include:
  • Having sexual intercourse at an early age
  • Having more than one partner
  • Don’t give up a lot of children
    Smoking (cigarettes produce chemicals that can damage cervical cells, making them more vulnerable to infection and cancer)
  • Using birth control drugs
    HIV infection (reduces the body’s ability to fight HPV infection and early forms of cancer)
  • By avoiding these risk factors, women can reduce their risk of developing cervical cancer. Women who do not have these risk factors rarely develop cervical cancer.

Men’s use of condoms in sexual intercourse can help women protect themselves from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases; however, condoms do not provide complete protection against HPV. Using a condom reduces the rate of infection by about 70 percent. This is because HPV can spread through physical contact with any infected area in the body.

How to prevent cervical cancer?

Two new vaccines are available that protect from the two most dangerous types of human papillomavirus (HPV) (HPV 16 and 18), which cause most cases of cervical cancer. These vaccines can prevent up to 70 percent of cervical cancer cases, but cannot prevent infection due to every virus that causes cervical cancer.
In order for the vaccine to be effective, it should be administered in 2 or 3 doses within 6 months. The World Health Organization (WHO) also recommends that girls aged 9-13 be vaccinated before they have sexual intercourse. Up to 45 years of age can be vaccinated. The vaccine is a preventive vaccine, not a therapeutic. However, it should be forgotten that even if vaccinated, regular Pap-Smear tests should be continued against cervical cancer.

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